Friday, November 04, 2005

Enacting the grand drama at the Great Stupa

Back in 1978, Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche was invited to Nepal to bestow the complete empowerments and reading transmissions for the New Treasures of Chokgyur Lingpa (Chokling Tersar). This invitation had been extended by Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche to ensure the continuation of the lineage for the entire termas of Chokgyur Lingpa at Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling Monastery in Boudhanath, Nepal, to a large group of incarnate masters, ordained and lay practitioners, including reincarnations of Chokgyur Lingpa, Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo, and Jamgon KongtrĆ¼l, headed by Trulshik Rinpoche, Shechen Rabjam Rinpoche, Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse, Chokling Mingyur Dewey Dorje, Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche and Orgyen Tobgyal Rinpoche, Tulku Pema Wangyal and Tulku Jigmey Khyentse, Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche, Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche and his son Jigme Norbu Rinpoche, and many many others.
At the end, an auspicious drama was performed to commemmorate how Buddhism was established at Samye in Tibet, showing the profound link between the wishes made in the past by Padmasambhava, King Trisong Deutsen and Shantarakshita. (I think you can see who those three actors were).

8 comments:

Karma Lungrik Tharchin said...

Wow, apart from all the blessing and inspiration, those "early days" (from my perspective, anyway) must have been FUN! I have Blazing Splendor ordered and can't wait!

sherabray said...

i just wondering what Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche wearing? Once i had saw him wear this during the fire puja...

Erik Pema Kunsang said...

He is wearing the ancient crown of the Tibetan kings since he played the part of Trisong Deutsen, the king who invited Padmasambhava to Tibet.
Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche --as Padmasambhava -- wears the lotus crown that 'liberates through seeing' and Trulshik Rinpoche -- as Shantirakshita -- wears the hat of a pandita-scholar.

Anonymous said...

Thank you.
Thank you so much for your blog. It is really wonderful to be able to see the Gurus.

Anonymous said...

Was this a play written for the occasion or was this a play from a traditional script?

Thanks!

Erik Pema Kunsang said...

The performance of this "play" follows loosly a script concealed as a hidden treasure by Padmasambhava more than a thousand years ago. Its purpose is to form an auspicious circumstance for the Buddha's teachings to be re-established in a new context, in a new place. The wonderful ambience of the great stupa in Boudhanath brought back memories of The Legend of the Great Stupa -- you may have read it -- where a poultry woman and her four sons makes wishes to bring the Dharma to Tibet at the completion of their virtuous endeavor. They were later reborn as the Shantarakshita, Padmasambhava, King Trisong Deutsen and one the ministers. The drama illustrates the importance of forming auspicious wishes -- something we can always try to emulate.

Anonymous said...

Is it possible to request the play-terma be performed in various places in the West in order to form auspicious circumstances for the Dharma to flourish?

Thanks!

Erik Pema Kunsang said...

Yes of course it is. Something close I saw at Rigdzin Ling years back when Chagdud Rinpoche had a performance of Padmasambhava's eight manifestations at his retreat center at the end of the yearly drubchen ceremony. It was very dignified and almost created the atmosphere of the Lotus-Born master having arrived in the USA!!!