Sunday, April 08, 2007

The Joy of Living



The first book by Tulku Urgyen's youngest son Mingyur Rinpoche has recently been released to rave reviews:
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. This refreshing book is yet another sign that the next generation of Buddhism is creative, cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary. Born in 1975 in Nepal, the author is among the generation of Tibetan lamas trained outside of Tibet, and he's also a gifted meditator. His brain activity has been measured during meditation, earning him the enviable sobriquet of "happiest man on earth." He fuses scientific and spiritual considerations, explaining meditation as a physical as well as a spiritual process. Mingyur Rinpoche knows from experience that meditation can change the brain. He experienced panic attacks as a child that he was able to overcome through intensive meditation. If diligently practiced, meditation can affect the "neuronal gossip"—his imaginative rendering of brain cell communication—that keeps us stuck in unhappy behaviors. The meditation master offers a wide variety of techniques, counseling ease in practice to avoid boredom or aversion. Less is more; practice shorter periods more often, he says. His approach will be especially welcome for anyone frustrated by meditation or convinced they're "not doing it right." This book is a fresh breath from the meditation room, written with kindness, energy and wit. Three cheers for a cheerful contemplative. (Mar. 6)
Buy it at your local independent bookseller, or if necessary Amazon.com

8 comments:

. . . said...

Thanks for letting us know! I seem to find anything from the Tulku Urgyen family very clear and helpful, so will certainly pick it up.

Anonymous said...

>His brain activity has been measured during meditation, earning him the enviable sobriquet of "happiest man on earth."<
And so cute too. But wait a minute! I thought Matthieu Ricard was hooked up to those electrodes too and HE was named "happiest man on earth"! What is this? Starting to sound like People magazine: "Happiest Man on Earth" "Sexiest Man Alive".
What gives?

michael said...

touche! (no wonder you opted to stay anonymous.)

Anonymous said...

I'm glad the reviewer said pick it up at local bookstore - small independent booksellers (especailly dharma ones) need our support to stay in business. The people who run them are obvously not in it to make alot of money. Even if you don;t get that 10% discount that you might get from large volume bookseller, consider it an offering to the dharma to buy from your local bookstore - even if it is not specifically dedicated to selling only dharma items - independent booksellers need your support. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

>touche! (no wonder you opted to stay anonymous.) <
Are you saying there is no room in the dharma for shallow, superficial people like me? My whole culture is shallow and superficial. Get with it. For shame!
I wonder what he would look like with his hair grown out? Would he still be happy? Sexy?

michael said...

No, actually i was complimenting you on your incisive critique of our need to label and judge even in our spiritual endeavours, claiming one religion, lineage or lama is better than another, even that one practice is better than another in the same lineage.
In my experience it often appears that tulkus are akin to rockstars, surrounded by a cult of personality that has little or nothing to do with teachings or deepening the individual's understanding. So i think one should seriously question why they prefer one lama to another--and of course it is imperative to be brutally honest with oneself about this and so i found your remarks quite refreshing and inspiring. Such an honest approach can bear great fruit.
I also believe it is quite worthwhile to question whether tulkus, who generally live a life of incredible privilege from an early age, would be as happy if they had to do their own dishes, laundry and pay the bills by working in a factory or cleaning toilets while spending sleepless nights caring for a colicky baby.
Never diminish the labour and sacrifice of the common man or woman--it is great indeed, as is the nobility of their efforts.
I often think that many in the Dharma could greatly benefit by applying common values and attitudes to the extraordinary situation they find themselves in when stepping onto the path. The Buddha was a practical man, with a good head on his shoulders--he set a fine example we easily forget.

Anonymous said...

http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=rantom913

Anonymous said...

i will read one day the book but for the moment i remenber what DKR said: "he would be the best choice for the tulku of Kangyur Rinpoche".[endnote 271]