Saturday, June 10, 2006

Imprint in the Moon Cave


Photo of Padmasambhava's footprint in the Moon Cave at Drak Yerpa. It was taken recently by Nick Dudka.

14 comments:

Jinzang said...

If you'd like to see Milarepa's footprint in Lapchi cave, it's in Lama Gursam's photo album.

Anonymous said...

I'm a very practical person - how does having the ability to put one's foot through rock benefit other beings?

Erik Pema Kunsang said...

To mention a few benefits: It helps the pilgrim who visits the Moon Cave to remember that Padmasambhava was there, that he was not an ordinary person, to open up for some trust in his teachings, and therefore to receive those teachings and apply them personally in practice. It is that practice which can liberate the mind.

Konchog Norbu said...

Erik! How marvelous to find you and this delicious blog. Well done and immediately linked. I absolutely loved reading Blazing Splendor and left it in our temple library so everyone could enjoy it.

Right now I have the odd distinction of being the only western monk living in Mongolia. The post-Commie Buddhist revival here is really something to be a part of. In particular, we're helping with the renaissance of their Nyingma lineages. I hope you and your sublime lamas visit someday!

About the footprint -- it also leaves an indication that so-called solid matter may not be as solid as we think!

Anonymous said...

Konchog Norbu,

Do you know of a Lama named Khambo Lama at Tashi Choeling Monastery in Ulan Bator? For many years - at least 10 or more - I have carried his name and address (including phone number!) around in my address book. I can't even remember anymore how I came to write the name down. Can you provide any information about this lama?
Thanks.

Konchog Norbu said...

"Khambo Lama" is a generic term that just means "abbot" or "head lama." The current abbot there is named Dambajav, a pleasant man who speaks good English, who replaced an elderly Geshe, but I'm not sure when.

Anonymous said...

why they put money?

Erik Pema Kunsang said...

You can see the imprint of the toes, so perhaps someone want to offer money for boots?
Joke aside - the money is a token for infinite offerings. Pilgrims usually give one while imagining billions and then dedicate the merit of all sentient beings.

conceição said...

ah, boots - - ben story.
i will send the picture to some friends.

Anonymous said...

and i say that remenber me Mingyur Rimpoche.

Anonymous said...

in the end every thing it´s perfect, isn´t it?

michael said...

in the beginning too! that's why they call it the Great Perfection.

Anonymous said...

and in the midle -- madhiamaka.

Anonymous said...

Evanesance of the moon rim
Still ordinary core
Brilliance of the sun's core
Still ordinary mind
Stars and spaces
Still ordinary mind
Fearless voyager through times
Still ordinary mind
Giving, loving, receiving
Still ordinary mind
Ease, contentment and fusion
Still ordinary mind
Unconnected, unfabricated,
Undimmed
Still ordinary mind
Happy to let go of her
Unordinary mind

A Required Field